MicroLEDs reach TV status

January 11, 2018 // By Julien Happich
While today's costly microLED developments, with micrometer pixel sizes made up of individual LEDs, are mostly aimed to serve high-definition microdisplays needed in augmented and virtual reality applications, Samsung Electronics has taken the bold step to demonstrate the expensive wafer-based technology stitched into a 146-inch TV screen.

Demonstrated at CES, the "Wall" as the company calls it is made up of tiles of microLEDs seamlessly jointed together and is described as a modular product. Arguably, the tiling scheme could be arranged by Samsung to match customers' specific requirements and the bezel-free "wall" could be combined with other units.

Samsung is mulling hard the development of QLED TVs (to compete with LG's AMOLED TVs), with plans to launch commercially a 8K QLED TV later this year. Yet the company keeps investing in microLED TV R&D in parallel, which has the potential for much brighter displays with a higher luminous efficiency, while still offering the pure blacks from OLEDs as it is too a self-emitting technology. In the long term, analysts in the industry see microLEDs eventually win over OLEDs and QLEDs, but for now microLED TVs would be a costly proposition.

“As the world’s first consumer modular MicroLED television, ‘The Wall’ represents another breakthrough. It can transform into any size, and delivers incredible brightness, color gamut, color volume and black levels. We’re excited about this next step along our roadmap to the future of screen technology, and the remarkable viewing experience it offers to consumers”, said Jonghee Han, President of Visual Display Business at Samsung Electronics.

Samsung Electronics - www.samsung.com

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