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Henkel joins Holst Centre research network on flexible electronics

Technology News |
By eeNews Europe

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Henkel’s knowhow in adhesives brings a new field of expertise to the Holst Centre’s shared research programs. It aligns with a large number of Holst Centre activities, such as the research towards large-area flexible OPV and OLED lighting and signage.

Adhesives with functional properties like electrical conductivity or moisture barrier protection have great potential in future electronics applications. Think about heterogeneous integration of silicon and plastic electronics.

Lamination and interconnection of functional foils enables new devices such as flexible solar cells (OPV), OLED lighting devices or flexible displays. Henkel plans to bring many of its technologies to these applications, drawing on expertise in electronics adhesives, pressure sensitive adhesives and more.

The partnership allows Henkel to further evaluate and develop its optically clear, electrically conductive and moisture barrier technologies, amongst others, on actual devices and not just on isolated material samples. This makes it more efficient to assess the market readiness of new developments.

Visit Henkel at www.henkel.com

Visit the Holst Centre at www.holstcentre.com


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