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Sweden to build its own quantum computer

Technology News |
By eeNews Europe

The focus is on developing a quantum computer with much greater computing power than the best supercomputers of today. A quantum computer is built of superconducting qubits, electrical circuits on a microchip that can host quantum states of single photons. Linking many qubits is relatively easy, but having control of quantum states and errors is difficult. Recently, researchers have learnt to control individual quantum systems such as individual atoms, electrons and particles of light, opening the door to completely new possibilities.

The initiative, headed up by Professor Per Delsing at Chalmers University of Technology, has been made possible by an anniversary donation of SEK 600 million from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation.

The Wallenberg Centre for Quantum Technology needs to recruit about 50 researchers under a decade-long research programme beginning in January 2018. In addition to the donation from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation further funds are coming from industry, Chalmers University of Technology and other universities, resulting in a total budget of close to SEK 1 billion.

“Our goal is to have a functioning quantum computer with at least a hundred qubits. Such a computer has far greater computing power than the best supercomputers of today and can be used, for example, to solve optimisation problems, advanced machine learning, and heavy calculations of the properties of molecules,” says Per Delsing, Professor of Quantum Device Physics at Chalmers University of Technology and the initiative’s programme director.

There is a great deal of interest in quantum technology throughout the world. Major investments are being made in the USA, Canada, Japan and China and the EU is launching a Quantum Technology Flagship in 2019. Companies such as Google and IBM are also investing in quantum computers and, like Chalmers, have chosen to base them on superconducting circuits. Policy-makers and business managers are starting to realise that quantum technology has the potential to change our society significantly, through improved artificial intelligence, secure encryption and more efficient design of medicines and materials.


“If Sweden is to continue to be a leading nation we need to be at the forefront in these fields. By focusing on the long-term expansion of expertise and by attracting the best young researchers we can put Sweden on the quantum technology map in the long term. There are no shortcuts. By investing in basic research we can ensure that the necessary infrastructure is in place so that over time other players and companies can take over and develop applications and new technologies,” says Peter Wallenberg Jr, chairman of the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation.

In addition to the focus project the research programme includes a national excellence initiative with the aim of carrying out research and building up expertise in the four sub-areas of quantum technology: quantum computers, quantum simulators, quantum communication and quantum sensors. Chalmers University of Technology is coordinating the first two sub-areas. The expansion of expertise in quantum communication is headed up by Professor Gunnar Björk at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, and Professor Stefan Kröll at Lund University is coordinating the quantum sensor field.

Chalmers researchers have been working on superconducting qubits for almost 20 years and have made many contributions to enhance knowledge in the field, including publications in Nature and Science. They were among the first in the world to create a superconducting qubit, and have explored a completely new area of physics through wide-ranging experiments on individual qubits.

“I am pleased that our quantum physics researchers, along with colleagues in the rest of Sweden, will have this opportunity to focus on a specific and important goal in a way that all of Sweden can benefit from the knowledge acquired. I would also like to extend my warmest thanks to the Wallenberg Foundation for its deep commitment and long-term support,” says Stefan Bengtsson, President and CEO of Chalmers.

In parallel with this, the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation is investing SEK 1 billion in artificial intelligence, channelled through the Wallenberg Autonomous Systems and Software Program (WASP), which was launched in 2015.

Wallenberg Centre for Quantum Technology – Wallenberg Centre for Quantum Technology

Chalmers University of Technology – www.chalmers.se

 

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