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Swedish quantum computer boost for industry

Business news |
By Nick Flaherty


Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden is to build a copy of its quantum computer that can be used by industry.

The Wallenberg Centre for Quantum Technology (WACQT) started working on a quantum computer in 2017 but the current 25 qubit system is rarely available, as researchers are constantly working to develop it. The aim is to build a 100 qubit version in 2029.

“We’re therefore going to build a copy of our quantum computer and make it available as a test bed for companies and researchers to run algorithms. Its purpose is to raise Sweden’s competence level in quantum technology and lower the threshold for using quantum computers,” says Prof Per Delsing, director of WACQT.

As a first stage, there is SEK 102 million (€9.1m) funding for a test bed. Alongside the quantum computer, this will have a quantum helpdesk to guide users and help them convert problems to executable quantum algorithms. The testbed will also provide test equipment for companies that are developing quantum technology components.

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“The idea is that users shouldn’t need much prior knowledge. It should be enough for a company to have a problem which they’ve heard might be solved by a quantum computer. The Quantum Helpdesk will help them from there,” says Delsing.

“Another big difference is that we’re transparent with what’s under the hood of our quantum computers. That allows you to optimise the algorithms for the hardware, thus increasing the chance of successful computations,” says Delsing.

The test bed will open its equipment for testing components and the Quantum Helpdesk in 2024, while the quantum computer will open for running algorithms in 2025. Initially, the quantum computer will have 25 qubits, but will be upgraded to 40 qubits within a couple of years.

Read more about the Wallenberg Centre for Quantum Technology

Other quantum articles 

 


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