Transport for London plans new road network lighting program to trim energy use by 40 per cent

Transport for London plans new road network lighting program to trim energy use by 40 per cent

Technology News |
One of the largest 'invest to save' strategic road lighting projects ever undertaken in the UK will see LED technology used for the modernisation of main road street lighting in London with the aim of reducing energy usage by 40 per cent.
By eeNews Europe

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Transport for London (TfL) has agreed the new energy efficient lighting program to help reduce the cost of lighting the TfL Road Network (TLRN), while also doing its part to reduce CO2 emissions across England’s capital city.

The project is geared to improving reliability and lower operating costs to provide better and safer roads.

Across London, TfL has some 52,000 street lights, and as part of the Mayor’s pledge to cut CO2 emissions, TfL has begun implementing the energy saving plan which will be delivered over the next three years.

By 2016, the programme aims to reduce associated CO2 by around 9,700 tonnes a year and contribute towards approximately £1.85m of savings for TfL a year.

The programme will also reduce energy consumption by more than 40 per cent by 2016, compared to the current levels.

The programme comprises two specific strands:

  • Replacing conventional lighting with Light Emitting Diodes (LED). The project will initially see 35,000 street lights updated through both targeted investment and TfL’s regular streetlight maintenance by 2016. The new LED technology will be rolled out across the majority of TfL street lights during the next ten years.
  • Introducing a Central Management System (CMS) for street lighting on the TLRN. This will allow TfL to remotely monitor and manage street lighting and dynamically control levels of lighting depending on use. By adjusting the lighting levels to be aligned better with traffic flows and road usage at different times of night TfL will significantly reduce its energy consumption and carbon emissions, without compromising road user safety or security. The system will remotely record lighting failures, enabling maintenance crews to ensure that lighting levels are restored without delay.

The Mayor of London, Boris Johnson, said: "With tens of thousands of lights marking the way on our road network it makes complete sense to focus energy and resources on bringing them up to 21st century standards. This is the largest investment to modernise street lighting on major roads in our capital’s history and will not only cut carbon emissions and save money but it will also lead to even better and safer roads for Londoners."
 
Dana Skelley, Director of Asset Management at TfL, said: "The performance and cost effectiveness of energy efficient lighting has improved considerably over the last few years. Our aim is to provide assets fit for the future and this programme to upgrade lighting on the Capital’s busiest roads is a simple, yet hugely effective way to not only reduce carbon emissions but to also reduce costs whilst providing better lighting of our road network."

TfL estimates the initial phase will cost £10.9m, which will reduce associated CO2 by around 9,700 tonnes a year and contribute towards approximately £1.85m of savings for TfL a year.

Previously, the capital costs of LED technology were prohibitive except for use in particular locations such as tunnels and subways.  But as the LED market has expanded and matured, the business and technology case is now proven.

In June 2011, the Upper Thames Street Tunnel in central London became the first UK tunnel to have linear LED lighting, which delivered a 60 per cent reduction in energy consumption as well as reduced maintenance costs. TfL has now installed a similar system into the A2 Eltham Tunnel and will look to progress a programme of installations in all tunnels across London during the next five years.

During the next ten years, TfL plans to invest about £4bn into the London’s road network.

Visit Transport for London at www.tfl.gov.uk
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