Breakthrough for quantum key distribution networks

September 04, 2020 //By Nick Flaherty
Breakthrough for quantum key distribution secure networks
Researchers at the Quantum Engineering Technology (QET) Labs in Bristol have built a multiplexed eight user quantum key distribution system with just eight receivers, a fraction of the current  requirement for QKD networks

An international team of researchers has developed the first distributed QKD network for sharing quantum keys in a breakthrough design.

So far, quantum key distribution has been point to point, even over satellites, but this limits the use in a network. The multiplexed photonic quantum key distribution (QKD) system, published in  Science Advances , supports eight users and can be easily scaled up.

“This represents a massive breakthrough and makes the quantum internet a much more realistic proposition,” said Dr Siddarth Joshi, who headed the project at the Quantum Engineering Technology (QET) Labs at the University of Bristol, UK. “Until now, building a quantum network has entailed huge cost, time, and resource, as well as often compromising on its security which defeats the whole purpose.”

“Our solution is scalable, relatively cheap and, most important of all, impregnable. That means it’s an exciting game changer and paves the way for much more rapid development and widespread rollout of this technology,” he said.

Photonic QKD systems use entangled photons to ensure an encryption key is not intercepted.

“Until now efforts to expand the network have involved vast infrastructure and a system which requires the creation of another transmitter and receiver for every additional user. Sharing messages in this way, known as trusted nodes, is just not good enough because it uses so much extra hardware which could leak and would no longer be totally secure.”

The team includes researchers from the UK’s  University of Leeds, Croatia’s Ruder Boskovic Institute (RBI) in Zagreb, Austria’s Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information (IQOQI), in Vienna, and China’s National University of Defence Technology (NUDT) in Changsha.

The team used multiplexing to develop an eight user system with eight transceivers, rather than the 56 that would previously be needed for each user to have a point to point link. The receivers were connected to optical fibres via different


Vous êtes certain ?

Si vous désactivez les cookies, vous ne pouvez plus naviguer sur le site.

Vous allez être rediriger vers Google.