Quantum breakthrough to enable safer online communication: Page 3 of 4

September 04, 2020 // By Jean-Pierre Joosting
New quantum technique for a secure quantum internet
A team of international scientists, led by the University of Bristol, have created a unique prototype network that could transform how we communicate online.

To demonstrate its functionality across distance, the receiver boxes were connected to optical fibres via different locations across Bristol and the ability to transmit messages via quantum communication was tested using the city's existing optical fibre network.

"Besides being completely secure, the beauty of this new technique is its streamline agility, which requires minimal hardware because it integrates with existing technology," Dr Joshi said.

In addition, the system also features traffic management, delivering better network control which allows, for instance, certain users to be prioritised with a faster connection.

Whereas previous quantum systems have taken years to build, at a cost of millions or even billions of pounds, this network was created within months for less than £300,000. The financial advantages grow as the network expands, so while 100 users on previous quantum systems might cost in the region of £5 billion, Dr Joshi believes multiplexing technology could slash that to around £4.5 million, less than 1 per cent.

In recent years quantum cryptography has been successfully used to protect transactions between banking centres in China and secure votes at a Swiss election. Yet its wider application has been held back by the sheer scale of resources and costs involved.

"With these economies of scale, the prospect of a quantum internet for universal usage is much less far-fetched. We have proved the concept and by further refining our multiplexing methods to optimise and share resources in the network, we could be looking at serving not just hundreds or thousands, but potentially millions of users in the not too distant future," Dr Joshi said.

"The ramifications of the COVID-19 pandemic have not only shown importance and potential of the internet, and our growing dependence on it, but also how its absolute security is paramount. Multiplexing entanglement could hold the vital key to making this security a much-needed reality."

See also: Researchers develop mobile quantum satellite ground station
See also: Sheffield University opens technology centre for quantum research


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