TI plans to sell or close Greenock wafer fab

February 04, 2016 //By Peter Clarke
TI plans to sell or close Greenock wafer fab
Texas Instruments Inc. has said it plans to "phase out" a wafer fab in Greenock, Scotland, that it acquired from National Semiconductor in 2011, putting hundreds of jobs at risk.

TI (Dallas, Texas) said in a statement covering its 4Q15 and full year 2015 financial results that it plans to "phase out" the Greenock facility over the next three years. TI plans to move move production from this facility to 200mm wafer fabs in Germany, Japan and Maine in the United States.

The Greenock plant currently employs 365 people, according to local reports but lay offs are not expected before late 2017. Most of the parts produced at the Greenock fab are part of TI's analog portfolio.

The wafer fab dates back to 1969 and was one of the first fabs that helped create Silicon Glen as a region of excellence in semiconductor manufacturing. It is now set to be one of the last sites left as much chip manufacturing has already moved out of Scotland.
 

According to reports TI has contracted with Atreg Inc. (Seattle, Wash.) to try and sell the facility as an on-going manufacturing concern.

"Our employees have done everything they can to keep the site cost-competitive, and we strongly considered ways to improve the site's efficiency, such as upgrading or expanding the facility. However, even with a considerable investment, TI's factory in Greenock would be far less efficient than our other larger, more efficient fabs, which have open capacity available to absorb what's produced in Greenock," the BBC quoted a TI statement as saying. 

TI announced a net income of $836 million on revenue of $3.19 billion for 4Q15. Profit was slightly up while sales were down 2 percent on the same period a year before. For the full year of 2015 TI made a net income of $2.99 billion on revenue of $13.00 billion. 

Related links and articles:

www.ti.com

News articles:

TI increases lead in analog vendor ranking

Report: Analog, TI both pass on Maxim purchase

Apple buys wafer fab in San Jose 

Indian wafer fab will be specialty foundry


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